Student research grants

Are you a student of veterinary medicine, veterinary nursing, agricultural studies or animal welfare?

Do you have an idea for a research project that could have a practical impact on raising animal welfare standards? 

Apply by 26th November for a 2019 project award.

 

  • AWF student grants were created to support the development of students in the field of animal welfare and are intended for extracurricular research projects only.
  • Projects must be designed to have a practical and positive impact on raising animal welfare standards and be based on sound scientific principles.
  • As well as stand-alone projects, we would accept applications for a series of projects or a pilot that could be later expanded into a bigger project.
  • Projects should be carried out in one block of time at any point during 2019.

 

WHO CAN APPLY?

The AWF student grant scheme is open to those studying veterinary medicine, veterinary nursing, agricultural studies and animal welfare, who will have completed 2 years of study by the start of the project and to students studying for an MSc. The scheme is not open to PhD students.

VALUE OF GRANT

The grant will cover the costs of the project and will allow for a stipend to be paid to the student undertaking the research. The stipend will be equivalent to the national minimum wage.

TIMETABLE

  • 26th November 2018: Deadline for submission of applications
  • 31st January 2019: Successful applicants notified

HOW TO APPLY

Please complete the  Student Grant Application Form_2018 and refer to the AWF Terms and Conditions before submitting your application.

 

What previous student researchers say...

  1. “This was an extremely formative experience for me. I have learnt a lot about the process of grant writing, completing a scientific project and working in a developing country.”

    Luke O'Connor, University of Bristol
  2. “I have never had the opportunity to take on a research project of my own and, in this case, I was able to design and execute a study from start to finish. I am proud of what I was able to achieve in just 8 short weeks. ”

    Victoria McCulloch, University of Edinburgh
  3. “I was amongst the speakers invited to an audience of industry professionals in Edinburgh. I gave a 30-minute presentation and had a positive response from the audience. This really built my confidence in public speaking and networking.”

    Charlotte Norman, University of Liverpool
  4. “I feel much more enthusiastic about undertaking further research into dairy cattle lameness and hope that I can play a part (however small) in reducing lameness within the dairy industry. ”

    Bethany Griffiths, University of Liverpool
  5. “I have really enjoyed the project, the highlight for me was presenting some findings to a meeting of the top people in dairy farming in Tesco. Everyone was very interested in the findings and keen to learn more about what I was reporting. ”

    Cherrill Bedford, University of Liverpool

 Scroll down to read about previous student projects and watch a short video of their presentations at the AWF Discussion Forum.

 

Evaluation of skin wounds in donkeys in Tamil Nadu

Evaluation of skin wounds in donkeys in Tamil Nadu

Imported rescue dogs: reasons, methods and welfare

Imported rescue dogs: reasons, methods and welfare

Public perception and poultry production

Public perception and poultry production

Deciphering the microbiome of infectious lameness causing lesions in dairy cattle

Deciphering the microbiome of infectious lameness causing lesions in dairy cattle

Investigating parasite burdens of orphaned one-horned rhino calves, juveniles and wild rhinos in Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India

Investigating parasite burdens of orphaned one-horned rhino calves, juveniles and wild rhinos in Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India

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